Journey Woman



International Travel Tip Bazaar

When She's in Rome, She Does as the Italian Women Do...
Feel free to be glamorous and stylish in Italy. I was in Rome and Florence in December when it was quite chilly. I noticed many of the women were wearing beautiful floor-length, wool sweater coats (mostly gray and black). I bought one for myself in Florence for about $40 US and then found a beautiful silk scarf to drape over it ($4 US). With high-heeled black leather boots I packed from home and black leather gloves (bought from the marketplace in Florence) I not only looked and felt totally Italian Vogue but I stayed warm too. Que Bellisimo!
Sabrina, Miami, Florida

She Identifies Her Suitcase...
I learned this trick from the flight attendant crew on a Tokyo flight and I want other women to know about it. Put a bright colored sticker or other identifier on the bottom/end of your suitcase. We always remember to use bright ribbons, scarves or other identifiers on the handle, but...think about it...your luggage always comes down the carousel bottom end first.
Brenda L. in the USA

She Wears a Panya. Do You...?
I've traveled in Europe, Asia, and Africa, and there is one thing I never leave home without. My panya. I bought it on my first trip abroad to West Africa. It's a 2 meter by 1 meter strip of brightly colored and paterned fabric and it's indespensible. I use it as a sheet, a sarong, my bath towel, a beach cloth, a privacy screen, a shawl, a table cloth, anything! It's made of a light cotton fabric so I can rinse it out often and it's dry in no time at all.
Cora, Takamatsu-shi, Japan

She Meets Children in Tibet...
If you meet children in rural Tibet who may extend their hand to you as if asking for candy or money, they are actually asking for pens or pencils. In this part of the world, due to the economic situation, most young people are not able to afford the utensils for learning. By carrying some writing utensils to give away, you are helping them get one of the greatest gifts which western children often take for granted, an education.
Karolina Pek, Shanghai, China

Her China Bathroom Blues...
Travelling in China, I found the washroom facilities in public places were almost always workable. However, there were times that the odours could be overwhelming. A lady on my tour brought along a very tiny bottle of lavender oil. A sniff of a small drop on my finger tip was a blessing and made the bathroom situation much more bearable.
Shirley Yarmoloy, Delta, Canada

Ed. note: Under these same circumstances, I carry a mentholated chapstick and dab a bit under my nose. Works wonders!

She Runs a B&B for Women in Florence...
I would like to tell women about my B&B in Florence, Italy. It is is a newly opened, exclusive accommodation, for women only, located at the top floor (no lift - 68 steps) of a historical palace in the center of Florence, Italy. With a stunning view of Brunelleschi's cupola of the Duomo, it overlooks a quiet inner garden and is only minutes away from the Uffizi, Ponte Vecchio, Santa Croce, the Accademia, the main train station and air terminal. Want to know more? Please visit http://www.bnb.it/beb
Paola Fazzini, Florence, Italy

She Uses Cable Ties on Her Luggage...
My friend Amy gave me this great idea to secure my luggage when I went to Brazil. Use cable ties. She says it's easier and quicker for thieves to pick a lock than to walk around with a cutting device (to sever the cables) and I agree. I purchased my cable ties at a hardware store. They were very cheap, less than $1.50 for a packet of around 20.
Dianne Penn, Brooklyn, USA

Ed. note: Cable ties are also great for securing the suitcase or cardboard boxes (checked luggage) filled with all the goodies that you purchased abroad and are bringing home with you.

She Carries a Screwdriver...
Whenever I travel I now carry one of the small double ended screwdrivers that many of the electronic service techies carry. It has saved me many frustrating moments and calls to the front desk for assistance in connecting things to my laptop or even opening a stuck suitcase lock.
Vicki, Orlando, USA

She Always Wears Her Socks...
I have been fortunate enough to travel to the Far East quite a few times. Many of the most interesting places to visit are temples, shrines and other holy places. Many times you are required to take off your shoes and leave them at the entrance. The entrance can be right on the street, and can require you to walk quite a distance across a courtyard. I have found that in order to avoid stepping on a very hot and/or dirty surface, the best thing is to carry a pair of the 'give away' socks provided by the airlines on long flights. They are quick and easy to slip on either over bare feet or your regular socks.
Judy M, Stratford, Canada

She's Culturally Correct in Nepal...
Despite the fact that it may seem impractical, hiking the Nepalese mountain trails in a skirt is not only culturally appropriate, but also provides some added decency when making pit stops. The Nepalese sherpas and porters with whom we trekked were very pleased and decidedly more comfortable to see women in skirts, and very offended by the women who insisted on wearing shorts during our month's travels through the country. As the elevation got higher, and it got cooler, we simply wore our tights and leggings underneath the skirts.
Diana, Calgary, Canada

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